+36 1 377 6737 Make an appointment online

Beat the Flu, prevention is the best cure

There is no point in weighing the odds about how serious the influenza epidemic will be this time. You can bet on it year in year out. So it makes sense to get vaccinated now.

The flu is not to trifle with. Especially when it gets better of a compromised immune system, a bout of influenza can end in serious complications. A good enough reason why children, the elderly and patients with chronic health conditions are considered to be at higher risk.
When it comes to prevention the rule of thumb is: the earlier the better. Don’t keep putting it off until the dreadful symptoms appear. 

Jump the queue and get your seasonal flu vaccination at Dr. Rose Private Hospital every weekday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. As a friendly incentive we encourage you to bring along a family member or friend and let them be your guest – their vaccination comes at no cost throughout November. Yes, that’s right: two for the price of one or 50% discount.

GOOD TO KNOW

Influenza is often confused with other respiratory diseases. The symptoms might be similar but the flu rarely starts with the typical signs of the common cold: coryza, the catarrhal inflammation of the mucous membranes in the nose, and swelling in the throat. Instead, the flu kicks off with a sudden fever, shivering, headache, muscle ache, general fatigue and exhaustion, and only later aggravated by a sore throat, dry and convulsive coughing, blocked or runny nose.

DOCTOR’S ORDER

Dr. Zsolt Pintér, head of the International Vaccination Center at Dr. Rose Private Hospital, explains the importance of timely vaccination: “Influenza strains are highly mutable, so a different type is likely to spread and cause a pandemic each season. That is why it is important to vaccinate against the flu every year – to be immunised against the most common strains in that particular season.
“After inoculation it takes roughly two weeks for your system to produce enough antibodies to give proper immunity that lasts the whole season, albeit patients with a compromised immune system, such as the elderly, might lose immunity before the season ends.”